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Olusegun Oguntoke
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Intra-urban pattern of cancer morbidity and the associated socio-environmental factors in Ile-Ife, South-western Nigeria


An analysis of cancer morbidity pattern was conducted in Ile-Ife city, with the aim of identifying the associative factors. Retrospective cancer cases from 1987 to 1996 were retrieved from the national cancer registries of tertiary hospital located in the city. The information on age, sex, cancer site and residential area of cancer patients was used to portray demographic and geographical distribution of cancer morbidity. Furthermore, questionnaire was administered to residents of sampled residential areas in order to elicit information on socio-economic, behavioural and environmental characteristics of selected areas. Out of the 2027 cases reported at Ife/Ijesha registry within the study period, breast cancer was the highest, followed by bone and glandular cancer (15% – 17%). Cancer cases vary significantly among age-groups with concentration among 46–60 years. Apart from high burden of cervical and breast among females, they equally reported higher cases of all cancer groups. Breast, prostate, gastro-intestinal, liver and skin cancers were higher in relatively modern areas while low socio-economic areas had significant proportions of urinary, gastro-intestinal and cervical cancers. Regular use of kerosene stove, alcohol consumption, indices of nativity and low socio-economic status showed significant correlation with selected cancer groups (P<0.05). Intervention programmes for cancer control should take cognizance of these variations at community level.

Keywords: Associative analysis, disease pattern, health transition urban health.


 

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